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  • An aortic thromboembolism results when a blood clot is dislodged and travels through the aorta, becoming lodged in a distant location. This causes severely reduced blood flow to the tissues receiving blood from that particular part of the aorta, leading to decreased oxygen in the tissues. Sudden paralysis and pain, usually in the rear legs, are the most common clinical signs of aortic thromboembolism.

  • In order to properly treat inflammatory or infectious ear conditions, topical ear medications are often necessary. Instilling ear medications into your cat's ears can be a challenging task, especially if they are uncomfortable. Have patience and contact your veterinarian if you are having difficulties.

  • The proper administration of eye medication is critical in helping your cat quickly recover from an eye injury or infection. Make sure you have carefully read the drug label and understand the prescription instructions.

  • Applying eye ointments to your cat's eye(s) can be a challenging or easy task. The proper administration of eye medications is essential for your cat's prompt recovery. It is important to use the medication as directed for the full duration and contact your veterinarian if you have problems. The tips and instructions in this handout may make administering your cat's eye ointment easier.

  • Applying topical medications to your pet can sometimes be a challenge. This information may help make treating your pet easier - for both of you.

  • Primary vaccination is essential in order to prevent the return of the once common deadly infectious diseases in kittens and cats. Recent research indicates that not all vaccines require yearly boosters. However, there is no evidence that annual booster vaccination is anything but beneficial to the majority of cats. Ultimately, how frequently your cat should be vaccinated is determined by your cat's lifestyle and relative risk. Ask your veterinarian about the type and schedule of vaccines that is appropriate for your cat.

  • Approximately 20% of cats across all ages suffer from painful osteoarthritis in one or more joints. The incidence of osteoarthritis increases with age. Because cats are living longer, it is more likely than ever that every cat owner will face the issue of osteoarthritis at some point.

  • Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex condition involving inflammation and degeneration of one or more joints. Cats with OA experience pain and inflammation in various joints that interfere with the activities of daily living.

  • Certain species of a common fungus called Aspergillus can infect the nasal cavity and sinuses of cats and can even become disseminated to different areas of the body. Cats affected by exposure to this fungus are usually immunosuppressed. Diagnosis of either form, the nasal form or disseminated form, can be difficult, usually requiring X-rays or more advanced imaging such as MRI or CT, as well as tissue biopsies and culture. Treatment of the nasal form involves topical administration of an antifungal agent while the cat is under general anesthesia, although oral antifungals such as itraconazole and posaconazole may also be used. Prognosis is fair to good. Treatment of the disseminated form is more difficult requiring additional antifungals, such as amphotericin b that can be harmful to the kidneys.

  • Aspirin is given by mouth in the form of a tablet, and is primarily used off label as an anti-clotting medication. It also acts as an anti-inflammatory, pain control, and fever-reducing medication. The most common side effects are gastrointestinal, such as vomiting, decreased appetite, diarrhea, and sometimes bleeding. Do not use aspirin in pets that have bleeding ulcers, bleeding disorders, asthma, pregnancy, or kidney failure. Aspirin should be used very cautiously in cats. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.