Neighbours of Edgemont Magazine Feature – Summertime Tips for Pets

Neighbours of Edgemont Magazine Feature – Summertime Tips for Pets

Our very own Marla Brillinger, veterinary assistant manager, was featured in the most recent issue of the Neighbours of Edgemont magazine with an article about summertime safety for pets. The article also featured three very special dogs from the Mountainside family: Sebastian, Rosie and Nixon.
 
Here are those tips for you to help your pet have a happy and safe summer:
 
SUMMERTIME TIPS FOR PETS
 
Summer is here and we have some useful tips to be aware of for you and your pet family. Always contact your local veterinarian or nearest emergency animal hospital for advice and treatment.
 
DOGS DIE IN HOT CARS!
 
The summer weather is here and every year, an alarming number of dogs die a horrific death that is completely preventable.
 
There is no rule of thumb based on breed, size or length of time left in a car before a dog succumbs to heat stroke, suffocation, and death.
 
It can literally happen in minutes.
Leaving windows open, covering your windows or parking in the shade does not help as there is no significant drop of temperature inside the car.
 
A seemingly, cooler and overcast day can still generate temperatures high enough to suffocate a dog.
 
Temperatures in an enclosed space rise very quickly and your dog, who pants to keep cool, cannot cool down in a hot, stuffy space.
 
Your dog’s enzyme systems will shut down rapidly and he or she will “boil” to death.
 
Do not take a chance with your pet…
 
Do not leave them in your car when there is a chance of warm or hot temperatures. If you suspect your dog is suffering from heat stroke, you need to get him or her to a veterinarian immediately.
 
Warning signs of impending heat stroke include:
 
1) Distressed, panting excessively, restlessness
2) Excessive drooling, excessive drooling from nose and/or mouth
3) Unsteady on feet
4) Gums turn blue/purple or bright red
 
If any of these signs become obvious, whether in a car or not, treat this as a medical emergency and get your pet to the vet immediately.
Ticks, Fleas & Other Pests
 
Because the temperature in this part of B.C. rarely goes below zero, fleas and ticks can survive year-round with spring and summer usually being the most prevalent.
 
Dogs are more likely to be outside hiking in deep brush where ticks like to live. There are numerous products available from your veterinarian that are extremely effective and safe.
 
There is also a Lyme vaccination available for dogs. Prevention goes a long way so talk to your vet about a product suitable for your dog.
 
Environmental Hazards
 
In addition to being hyper-vigilant about leaving dogs in cars during the warmer months it is always good to be aware of over-exercising your dog and the dangers of heat exhaustion. Pay attention to the surface you are exercising your dog on as the heat of pavement can burn your pets foot pads.
 
Summer is a time to enjoy flowers and plants but they’re not always good for your family pets.
 
Lilies, for example, are highly toxic for cats and various types of mushrooms are also poisonous for your dog.
 
Be careful of what Fido or Fluffy are foraging for inside the house and outside.
 
We continue to see marijuana toxicities come to the emergency department at Mountainside on a regular basis and this plant and its derivatives can cause serious harm to your pets.
 
Stay safe and enjoy the Dog, and Cat, Days of Summer!
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